Projects

Redbud Tree

ReLeaf Stratford is planting 2022 Native Trees in 2022, the Year of the Garden

2022 is the Year of the Garden and in celebration ReLeaf Stratford is spearheading a project to plant 2022 native trees in Stratford and area green spaces. 

Native trees support the largest number of insects, birds and mammals. ReLeaf Stratford and Stratford Master Gardeners are launching this project to support planting more native trees in our home gardens and public spaces.

If you would like to donate to this worthwhile project, the button links to Canada Helps, Master Gardeners of Ontario. In the box “send a message to this charity” indicate that your donation is intended for the ReLeaf Stratford project. Canada Helps will issue a donation receipt.

Pollinator Garden

Pollinator Pathways

A future project will be to promote the planting of pollinator pathways in spaces that currently are unplanted or neglected. 

RELEAF NATIVE TREE & SHRUB SALE - SPECIES

Sale is APRIL 30, 2022 at Avondale Church parking lot (enter via Huntingdon Avenue). Payment by cash or etransfer only.
PAGODA DOGWOOD Cornus alternafolia

Deciduous, small tree or large shrub suitable for a small space, in a shrub border, a woodland garden or a naturalized area. Small, fragrant, yellowish-white flowers bloom late spring and give way to a bluish-black fruit. Medium green leaves turn a beautiful reddish-purple in fall.

Pagoda dogwood typically grows 4.6–7.6m (15′-25’) high and spreads 6-9.7m (20′-32’) with an attractive tiered /layered horizontal branching shape. Plant in full sun to part shade in well-drained soil.  

Wildlife benefits include being a larval host plant for caterpillars, a nectar source for bees and butterflies and a food and shelter source for birds.

$14.00 – 1 gallon, 75-100 cm. height

Photo courtesy of A Cultivated Art
SHADBLOW SERVICEBERRY Amelanchier canadensis

Deciduous, early-flowering shrub or small tree suitable for butterfly, native and shade gardens. Fragrant, showy white flowers emerge in spring prior to the leaves. Dark green leaves turn to orange-red in fall. Edible berries, harvested in the summer, resemble blueberries and are used in jams, jellies and pies.

Serviceberry typically grows 7.6-9m (25′ – 30’) high and spreads 4.6-6m (15′-20’) in a multi-stemmed, irregular shape. Easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soil, full sun to part shade.

Wildlife benefits include being a host plant for the Red-Spotted Purple and Viceroy butterflies, the nectar attracts bees and butterflies and the berries songbirds.

$14.00 – 1 gallon, 75-100 cm. height

Photo Wikmedia Commons
NANNYBERRY Viburnum lentago

Deciduous, large, upright shrub with multiple stems that can also be grown as a small tree (when root suckers are removed). Nannyberry is suitable for use as a small tree, a tall hedge, in a shrub border, a woodland garden or a naturalized area. Non-fragrant white flowers bloom in spring. Dark green glossy leaves turn to a greenish-yellow to reddish-purple in fall.  Ripe edible berries attract birds in the fall/winter or can be eaten off the bush and used in jams and jellies.

Nannyberry typically grows 4.2-4.9m (14′-16’) high and spreads 1.8-3.6m (6′-12’) with an arching shape. Easily grown in full sun to part shade in average, medium, well-drained soil.

Wildlife benefits include being a nectar source for butterflies and a food source for birds.

$14.00 – 1 gallon, 20-40 cm. height

Photo Wikmedia Commons
CHOKECHERRY Prunus virginiana

Deciduous, small tree or large shrub suitable for small spaces (in the tree form), hedges, and pollinator gardens and is drought and heat tolerant. Fragrant, cup-shaped, white flowers bloom in long clusters mid-spring and give way to dark purple/black berries in August. Berries are edible when processed into jams, jellies and pies. Green leaves turn yellow to orange in fall.

Chokecherry typically grows 6-9m (20′-30’) high and spreads 4.6-6m (15′-20’) with an oval-rounded crown.  Plant in full sun to part shade in average dry to medium well drained soil.

Wildlife benefits include being a larval host plant for the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly. Chokecherry attracts other pollinators and provides fruit and nesting materials for birds.

$14.00 – 1 gallon, 75-100 cm. height

Photo Graham Page, Wild Plants From Seed
WITCH HAZEL Hamamelis virginiana

Deciduous, small tree or large shrub suitable for small spaces (in the tree form), shrub borders and pollinator gardens. Clusters of bright yellow flowers bloom in mid-to-late fall. Fruit that develops over a long period overwinters into the next season providing winter garden interest. Dark green leaves turn yellow in fall.

Witch hazel typically grows 4.6-6m (15-20’) high and spreads 4.6-6m (15’20’) with a multi-stemmed, open shape. Plant in full sun to part shade in average, medium, well drained soils. This plant is intolerant of drought but is tolerant to heavy clay soil and erosion.

Wildlife benefits include nectar for pollinators and fruit for birds. 

$16.00 – 2 gallon, 75-100 cm. height 

Photo Wikmedia Commons
GRAY DOGWOOD Cornus racemosa

Deciduous, large shrub suitable for group plantings, in shrub borders, near ponds and in pollinator gardens. Clusters of white flowers bloom in spring and give way to showy white berries. Stems holding the flowers are a distinctive red with the red colour lasting into early winter. Grey-green leaves turn red/purple in fall.

Grey dogwood typically grows 3-4.6m (10′-15’) high and spreads 3-4.6m (10′-15’) in an irregular, rounded shape. Plant in full sun to part shade in average, medium, well-drained soil. Plant tolerates a wide range of soil conditions, including both moist and somewhat dry soils and will form thickets if root suckers are not removed.

Wildlife benefits include nectar for bees, butterflies and other pollinators as well as fruit and nesting locations for songbirds.

$12.00 – 1 gallon, 20-40 cm. height

Photo Wikmedia Commons
PUSSY WILLOW Salix discolor

Deciduous, large shrub to small tree suitable as an ornamental, as a shrub border, hedge, near ponds and in pollinator gardens. Before the foliage emerges in late winter, the male plants produce silky grey catkins. Green leaves turn golden yellow in fall.

Pussy Willow typically grows 1.8-4.6m (6′-15’) high and spreads 1.2-3.6m (4′-12’) in a multi-stemmed, erect shape. Shrubs may be cut to the ground every 3-5 years to maintain a smaller size. Plant in full sun to part shade in average, medium to wet, well-drained soil. Plant is not tolerant of dry soils.

Wildlife benefits include being a larval host plant for the Viceroy butterfly and a nectar source for butterflies, specialized bees and other pollinators. An important early food source for emerging native bees.

$12.00 – 1 gallon, 40-75 cm. height

Photo Vern Wilkins, Indiana University
CHINQUAPIN OAK Quercus muehlenbergii

Medium-sized oak in the white oak family. This oak tree has a pyramidal shape in youth, becoming more rounded with age. Chinquapin oak has a straight trunk and pleasing outline, especially in maturity. Glossy, attractive leaves are toothed rather than lobed and resemble chestnut leaves. Fall colour varies from yellow to orange-brown. 

Height 40′-50′  at maturity. Plant in full sun. Tolerates a variety of urban soils, including dry sites and alkaline soils. Native to southern Ontario but uncommon in the wild.

The small, sweet acorns are a favourite of birds and other wildlife. Flower nectar and pollen support bees and hummingbirds. Chinquapin oak is the larval host plant for a wide variety of butterflies and moths. Native oaks are a keystone species in Ontario supporting the largest biodiversity of wildlife.

$16.00 – 1 gallon, 75-100 cm. height

Photo Wikmedia Commons by Krzysztof Golik
ELDERBERRY Sambucus canadensis

Deciduous, large shrub suitable for group plantings in naturalized areas, as a shrub border or hedge and in pollinator gardens. Small fragrant white flowers in flat-topped clusters bloom in late spring. Flowers give way to drooping clusters of black elderberry fruits in late summer.  Berries are edible cooked in pies, jams, and jellies and used in winemaking. Green leaves turn golden yellow in fall.

Elderberry typically grows 1.5-3.6m (5′-12’) high and spreads 1.5-3.6m (5′-12’) with a multi-stem arching shape. Plant in full sun to part shade in medium to wet, well drained soils. Plant is tolerant to clay soil, wet soil and erosion.

Wildlife benefits include nectar for butterflies and hummingbirds, fruit for songbirds and nesting sites for birds. 

$12.00 – 1 gallon, 40-75 cm. height

Photo Graham Page, Wild Plants From Seed
DWARF BUSH HONEYSUCKLE Diervilla lonicera

Deciduous small shrub suitable for small spaces and pollinator gardens. Tube-like flowers bloom in late spring to early summer. Flowers initially bloom pale yellow and then fade to an orange- red. Dark green, glossy leaves turn yellow to orange and red in fall.

Bush honeysuckle typically grows .6-1m (2′-3’) high and spreads .6-1.2m (2′-4’) in a densely branched shape.  Plant in full sun to part shade in average, dry to medium moisture, well drained soils. Tolerates drought and a lightly shaded garden. Can be used as an understory shrub under other larger trees and shrubs. Excellent for stabilizing slopes.

Wildlife benefits include nectar that attracts butterflies and hummingbirds.

$14.00 – 1 gallon, 40-75 cm. height

Photo Graham Page, Wild Plants From Seed
BLACK CHOKEBERRY Aronia melanocarpa

Deciduous, medium size shrub suitable for group plantings in shrub borders or hedges, near ponds and in pollinator gardens. Clusters of white and pink flowers bloom in spring. Black berries ripen in fall and are edible processed into jams and jellies. Green glossy leaves turn red/purple in fall.

Black chokecherry typically grows 1-1.8m (3′-6’) high and spreads 1-1.8m (‘3-6’) with a multi-stemmed, rounded and spreading shape. Plant in full sun to part shade in average, medium moisture, well-drained soil. Plant is tolerant of wet or occasionally dry soil.

Wildlife benefits include nectar for butterflies and other pollinators as well as fruit for songbirds.

$12.00 – 1 gallon, 40-75 cm. height

Photo Wikmedia Commons
NEW JERSEY TEA Ceanothus americanus

Deciduous, compact, dense, rounded shrub suitable for small spaces, shrub borders, pollinator gardens and is drought and heat tolerant. Small, fragrant, white flowers bloom in late spring and give way to a red to black berries. Medium to dark green leaves turn to tan and yellow in fall. Young yellow twigs add winter interest to the garden. A nice native substitute for hydrangea.

New jersey tea typically grows .6-1m (2′-3’) high and spreads 1-1.5m (3′-5’). Easily grown in average, dry to medium, well drained soil in full sun to part shade. This plant is also tolerant to drought and shallow rocky soil.

Wildlife benefits include being a larval host plant for the Mottled Duskywing and Summer Azure butterflies. The nectar is also highly attractive to butterflies, bees, moths and hummingbirds. Seeds from the berries are eaten by songbirds.

$14.00 – 1 gallon, 20-40 cm. height

Photo Doug McGrady, Rattlesnake Hill